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Hire with Safety in Mind

Always Perform Your Own Research on a Pro Service Provider You Plan to Work with.

  • Review the pro service provider's profile

    Review the Pro profile Profiles are designed to give you helpful information to hire the right pro vendor or service provider. Remember - You're the boss.

    Customer reviews. See what past customers say about a pro. Verified reviews are from customers who hired a pro on ValueEgg while unverified reviews are from customers who found the pro somewhere else. You can also see how a pro responded to reviewers, which can help you understand how they interact with their customers.

    Choose at least 5 pros or service providers who are interested in helping you. View their profile, read their reviews, investigate and chat with them through messages to help you make your hiring decision easy.

    Here are some tips to ensure you hire the right Pro for your requirement.

    Business information. The profile gives the pro a chance to tell you about their business —and explain why you should hire them. You’ll see things like pictures of their work, a description of their business, why they love what they do, a link to their website and how many times they’ve been hired on ValueEgg. View photos and videos. Photos and videos are an excellent way to visualize a service provider abilities and work quality. Check for credentials. Good quality credentials is usually a good indication of a Pro's experience. Communicate freely. We make it easy to contact a Pro directly through phone calls or direct messages. Don't fall for price. Be wary of a price that is significantly cheaper than the rest. Always ask questions. Remember - You're the boss. Need more information? Ask the pro to provide what you are looking for.

    Credentials. We know a pro’s credentials are important to hiring with confidence.

    Ask questions.  We make it easy to talk a pro without revealing any of your contact info. So ask as many questions as you need, and tell them exactly what you’re looking for. You might want to ask about: pictures of past work references from past customers, whether your project requires a permit, if the pro plans to subcontract any of the work. You can also send a pro pictures of what you’re looking for. Don’t be afraid to schedule a phone call or an in-person meeting.

    Research.  It’s always worth seeing what other information you can find about a pro you’re considering. Think about resources like the Better Business Bureau or a web search to look for more information. You can also check out third-party resources like the Federal Trade Commission’s guide to hiring a contractor for additional tips.

    Plan ahead to make sure the job is done right

    Set expectations in writing. A written agreement is the best way to make sure everyone is on the same page. Include details like the who, what, where, and cost of your project.

    Agree on payment.  Especially for high-value projects, don’t pay with cash (or via wire transfer or cashier’s check), and limit your down payment—in fact, some state laws limit the amount a pro can ask for up front. Consider making payments during the project contingent on completion of defined amounts of work.

    Think through insurance, permitting, and licensing

    Verify insurance. Something unexpected may happen during your project, so check your insurance policies to make sure you’re covered. Your own insurance provider is always the best resource to learn if your policy covers any risks associated with your project. You should also verify a pro’s insurance. See this page for tips.

    Get permits and check licensing. A pro’s license requirements (or whether permits are required for your project) depends on the laws of your city and state, and what kind of project you’re hiring for. Contact your state or local government about specific questions. We know this can be daunting, so we’ve pulled together some tips and resources to help you get started: A business license is NOT the same thing as an occupational license. A business license generally just means the pro is registered to do business in a city or state. It doesn’t authorize the pro to do any specific kind of project. An occupational license is what authorizes a pro to do certain kinds of work—for instance, as a plumber or an electrician. ValueEgg’s policy allows only occupational licenses to qualify for a license badge. Some pros may be licensed for your job under the license of an authorized business associate with whom they work. If a pro has provided the correct documentation to verify that they are properly operating under a valid license, we may list the associate's license as "verified" on the pro's profile.

    As a marketplace, ValueEgg does not dictate or control the actions of any professional or Pro or Vendor or Customer
    using our matching platform service.
  • Learn more about the pro

    Ask questions. We make it easy to talk a pro without revealing any of your contact info. So ask as many questions as you need, and tell them exactly what you’re looking for. You might want to ask about:

    - Pictures of past work

    - References from past customers

    - Whether your project requires a permit

    - If the pro plans to subcontract any of the work

  • - You can also send a pro pictures of what you’re looking for. Don’t be afraid to schedule a phone call or an in-person meeting.

    Research. It’s always worth seeing what other information you can find about a pro you’re considering. Think about resources like the Better Business Bureau or a web search to look for more information. You can also check out third-party resources like the Federal Trade Commission’s guide to hiring a contractor for additional tips.

  • Plan ahead to make sure the job is done right

    - Set expectations in writing. A written agreement is the best way to make sure everyone is on the same page. Include details like the who, what, where, and cost of your project.

    - Agree on payment. Especially for high-value projects, don’t pay with cash (or via wire transfer or cashier’s check), and limit your down payment—in fact, some state laws limit the amount a pro can ask for up front. Consider making payments during the project contingent on completion of defined amounts of work.

  • Think through insurance, permitting, and licensing

    - Verify insurance. Something unexpected may happen during your project, so check your insurance policies to make sure you’re covered. Your own insurance provider is always the best resource to learn if your policy covers any risks associated with your project. You should also verify a pro’s insurance.

    - Get permits and check licensing. A pro’s license requirements (or whether permits are required for your project) depends on the laws of your city and state, and what kind of project you’re hiring for. Contact your state or local government about specific questions. We know this can be daunting, so we’ve pulled together some tips and resources to help you get started:

    - A business license is NOT the same thing as an occupational license. A business license generally just means the pro is registered to do business in a city or state. It doesn’t authorize the pro to do any specific kind of project. An occupational license is what authorizes a pro to do certain kinds of work—for instance, as a plumber or an electrician.

    - There are several online resources that can help you verify a pro’s occupational license. For example, BRB Publications, Inc. maintains a database of some state occupational licensing board websites.